Leo And John

Way back in Renaissance times Leonardo saw his world falling into a rut. Schools were not producing new Leonardos; they were turning out clones of the teachers. He saw stagnation and  passivity in what he called the "imitable sciences" and what we now call STEM.

"

In imitable sciences the student can attain equality with the master and can produce similar fruit [such as] mathematics where the pupil takes in as much as the master gives ... like letters where the copy has the same value as the original ... reproduced indefinitely as is done in the printing of books source

"

Much more recently John Dewey took up the fight against the clone-the-teacher model that pulled the whole curriculum over to "physical things" and away from life.

"

Matthew Arnold insisted that the important thing, the indispensable thing in education, is to become acquainted with human life itself, its art, its literature, its politics, the fluctuations of its career. Such knowledge, he contended, touches more closely our offices and responsibilities as human beings, since these, after all, are to human beings and not to physical things. Such knowledge, moreover, lays hold of the emotions and the imaginations and modifies character, while knowledge about things remains an inert possession of speculative intelligence. source

"

Dewey had no time for wimps. He loved the fact that life requires initiative. You can't just sit there while your teacher pours it into you. That is still true today. Self schooling requires you to get up off your duff. Most of your classmates won't.